The Warrior

Performance: 2.5 hours at Harold J. Miossi Art Gallery, in San Luis Obispo, California, as part of Inverse Performance Art Festival, 2017

 

Chun Hua Catherine Dong wears military suit, lying on a scaffold

Chun Hua Catherine Dong's face is covered by a hairy mask, she wears military suit, crawling on a scaffold

Chun Hua Catherine Dong wears a hairy strange mask from wild animal and military suit

Chun Hua Catherine Dong wears a hairy strange mask and points at her audiences

Chun Hua Catherine Dong's face is covered by a hairy mask, she wears military suit and does yoga on a a scaffold

Chun Hua Catherine Dong's face is covered by a hairy mask, she wears military suit and does yoga on a a scaffold

Chun Hua Catherine Dong's face is covered by a hairy mask, she wears military suit and looks down on a a scaffold

Chun Hua Catherine Dong wears military suit, lying on a scaffold

Chun Hua Catherine Dong's face is covered by a hairy mask, she wears military suit, and her finger points to her audiences

Chun Hua Catherine Dong's face is covered by a hairy mask, she wears military suit and does yoga on a a scaffold

Chun Hua Catherine Dong's face is covered by a hairy mask, she wears military suit and does yoga on a a scaffold

Chun Hua Catherine Dong's face is covered by a hairy mask, she wears military suit and does yoga on a a scaffold

Chun Hua Catherine Dong's face is covered by a hairy mask, and she is pushed aways by a woman at the end of her performance

“The Warrior” is a durational performance that explores how to use self-care, a new feminist strategy of resistance, to transform violent conflicts. Recent feminist discourse discusses to the potential power and radical nature of embracing self-care to explore our vulnerabilities because if “I matter, we matter, we are transforming what matters.” In this performance, I employ the similar strategy to create a liminal being by subverting my body to a site of contradiction and satire. The war is not inevitable. Conflicts can be diffused and transformed; arms can be laid down for good. Peace may often be elusive, but it is within our grasp which is both a gift and a task. For me, what the most important thing in this performance is to create some positive and sustainable gestures/actions that have capabilities to transform violence without depicting violence itself. Through satirizing the role of armed-force and juxtaposing the meditative gestures, this performance not only reveals a powerful sense of self and openness, but also turns the battle ground to a harmonious meditation space that cherishes human dignity, peace with justice, and shared well-being.

photo credit: Cynthia Post Hunt, Elaine Thap